Shell Guide: Coenobita compressus

Preferred Shell Guide to Coenobita compressus (ecuadorian) in Captivity

Nerita scabricosta

Good for tiny-small crabs

Will probably only move into them if previously worn and modified.

 

Littoraria zebra (zebra periwinkle)

Good for tiny-small crabs

Prefer pre-worn/modified shells, but will move into a new one.

 

Thais biserialis, T. orbita, T. haemastoma, T. melones, T. speciosa (various thais species) Good for tiny-large crabs

Prefer pre-worn/modified shells, but will move into a new one.

 

Melongena melongena (fiber conch, crown conch) Good for medium-large crabs

Prefer the pre-worn/modified, but will move into a new one.

 

Euspira lewisii, Cryptonarctica affinis, Polinices duplicatus, Neverita didyma (various moon snails, whale’s eye, sharks eye)

Good for tiny-jumbo crabs. Will move into a new one.

 

Cantharus melanostomus

Good for small-large crabs. Will move into a new one.

 

Babylonia areolata, B. spirata

Good for tiny-large crabs

       

C. compressus will also use turbo shells, though, they prefer “D” openings. See the C. clypeatus shell guide for many turbo names and photos.

Compressus modify their shells over years, and through many different occupants. They remove the inner columella to create more space for their abdomen as they grow, and decrease the weight of the shell. This allows them to keep the shell for many years, which is valuable because shell competition is fierce. This is why compressus has such a stubborn nature when it comes to shells. They prefer shells that have already been gutted, and it can take a long time before they give up their precious old home for a new one.